We’re Almost Done With This Goddamn Election Season. But, Before It Ends, Here’s Our Last-Minute 2016 Dallas Voter Guide (Beyond The Presidential Race).

By this point, most folks have already made up their minds about who they’re voting for at the top of the ballots on November 8. But it’s important to remember that we have local races to focus on as well, and that, perhaps more so than the president, it’s these picks that could truly affect your day-to-day lives as North Texans.

These votes are a big deal — especially when you consider that a record 15 million people registered to vote in Texas before the October 11 deadline this year, with both Dallas County and Tarrant County having more than a million registered voters each.

But, because these races don’t get the attention the presidential one does, it’s easy to be confused about whatb exactly is up at stake on your ballot. To that end, we’ve provided below a few key points to consider about each of the U.S. House districts races in Dallas, Tarrant and Denton counties, as well as two big area propositions that will have impacts for years to come.

Read on, make up your mind — we’re not here to sway you, just to help educate you — and then go vote! Because it does matter.

Plus, knowing this stuff will probably make you a bigger hit at our our election night party (doors at 8). — Obed Manuel

US Representative, District 5.

Ken Ashby (Libertarian). Opposes raising minimum wage; favors allowing workers to choose private Social Security options; believes global warming is an unproven, man-made theory; favors total withdrawal of U.S. troops from Middle East. (Source: Dallas Morning News Voter Guide.) 

Jeb Hensarling (Republican, incumbent). Favors repealing and replacing Obamacare; supports simplifying tax code; supports strengthening border security; opposes gun control measures. (Source: Candidate’s website.) 

US Representative, District 30.

Eddie Bernice Johnson (Democrat, incumbent). Served in Congress since 1993; supports maintaining, strengthening Obamacare; supports raising minimum wage to $10.10; supports clean energy initiatives; supports gun control measures and mental health reform. (Source: Dallas Morning News Voter Guide.)

Charles Lingerfelt (Republican). Supports repealing Obamacare; opposes raising minimum wage; supports enforcing immigration laws; supports total withdrawal of U.S. troops from Middle East. (Source: Dallas Morning News Voter Guide.)

Thom Prentice (Green). Opposes any U.S. intervention in foreign affairs; favors shutting down FBI, CIA, NSA and Homeland Security; supports $22 minimum wage; supports ending “war on drugs.” (Source: Dallas Morning News Voter Guide)

Jarrett R Woods (Libertarian). Ran for state district 108 in 2010. No other information available for current election. (Source: Candidate’s website.)

US Representative, District 32.

Ed Rankin (Libertarian). Supports a national sales tax instead of current tax code; supports gun control measures crafted by states; supports term limits; supports U.S. being reimbursed for military bases in allied nations. (Source: Candidate’s website.)

Pete Sessions (Republican, incumbent). Served in Congress since 1996; supports increased military action to combat ISIS; opposes raising minimum wage; opposes gun control measures; supports allowing private Social Security plans; supports repealing Obamacare. (Source: Dallas Morning News Voter Guide)

Gary Stuard (Green). Supports raising minimum wage to $15 an hours; supports immigration reform; supports unionizing efforts; supports clean energy initiatives; supports tuition-free education at every level, including college; support single-payer healthcare system; opposes U.S. military interventions. (Source: Candidate’s website.)

US Representative, District 33.

M Mark Mitchell (Republican). Supports a flat 10 percent tax; opposes any gun control measures; supports repealing Obamacare; supports an “anti-abortion amendment.” (Source: Candidate’s website.)

Marc Veasey (Democrat, incumbent). Elected to office in 2012; supports a $10.10 minimum wage; supports maintaining Obamacare; supports comprehensive immigration reform; supports Obama administration’s efforts to combat ISIS. (Source: Dallas Morning News Voter Guide.)

US Representative, District 24.

Mike Kolls (Libertarian). Supportive of abandoning Social Security in favor of privatized retirement plans; supportive of states setting their own immigration policies. (Source: League of Women Voters Guide.)

Kenny E Marchant (Republican, incumbent). Supportive of mass deportation, increased military intervention in ISIS-controlled areas and tax reductions for all income levels. (Source: League of Women Voters Guide.)

Kevin McCormick (Green). Supportive of simplified tax code, with reduced rates on lower- and middle-income families and ending the wars in the Middle East. Supportive of Medicare expansion. (Source: League of Women Voters Guide.)

Jan McDowell (Democrat). Supportive of increased immigration — including path to citizenship for those here illegally, as well as refugees fleeing terror in their home countries. Supportive of tax increases on wealthier Americans. (Source: League of Women Voters Guide.)

US Representative, District 26.

Mark Boler (Libertarian). Supportive of limited military intervention and eliminating the IRS. (Source: League of Women Voters Guide.)

Michael C Burgess (Republican, incumbent). Endorsed by Ted Cruz. Supportive of reducing all immigration — even legal. Supportive of repealing the Affordable Care Act. (Source: League of Women Voters Guide.)

Eric Mauck (Democrat). Self-professed comedian (really). Supportive of reduced taxes for middle class, lower interest rates on student loans and a minimum wage increase. (Source: League of Women Voters Guide.)

US Representative, District 6.

Joe Barton (Republican, incumbent). Elected to Congress in 1984; served as chair of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce; opposes raising minimum wage; supports repealing Obamacare; supports strengthening border security before considering immigration reform; supports increased military efforts against ISIS. (Source: Dallas Morning News Voter Guide.)

Darrel Smith Jr (Green). Opposes city financing of proposed Texas Rangers stadium; supports a federal minimum hourly wage of $10.10; supports clean energy initiatives; supports universal healthcare plan. (Source: Candidate’s website.)

Ruby Faye Woolridge (Democrat). Supports raising minimum wage; supports amending Obamacare to lessen costs of insurance plans and medicines; supports comprehensive immigration reform; supports clean energy initiatives; supports restoring federal and state grants for community policing. (Source: Candidate’s website.)

US Representative, District 12.

Bill Bradshaw (Democrat). Supports $15 hourly minimum wage; supports universal healthcare system; supports tuition-free higher education; supports ending “war on drugs.” (Source: Fort Worth Star-Telegram 2016 Voters Guide)

Ed Colliver (Libertarian). Supports less government involvement in private sector; supports balancing federal budget. (Source: Candidate’s website.)

Kay Granger (Republican, incumbent.) First elected to Congress in 1996; supports increased military action against ISIS; supports repealing Obamacare; supports strengthening border security; supports a balanced budget amendment. (Source: Candidate’s website.)

US Representative, District 25.

Loren Marc Schneiderman (Libertarian). Supports scaling down size of federal government; supports term limits; supports eliminating federal income tax; supports localized education policies. (Source: Fort Worth Star-Telegram 2016 Voters Guide, )

Kathi Thomas (Democrat). Supports raising minimum wage to $15; supports campaign finance reform; supports comprehensive immigration reform; supports low-cost higher education. (Source: Fort Worth Star-Telegram 2016 Voters Guide, Candidate’s website.)

Roger Williams (Republican, incumbent). Served as Texas Secretary of State from 2004-2007; supports repealing Obamacare; opposes gun control measures; supports focusing energy dependence on U.S. resources; supports elements of privatizing Social Security and Medicare; supports balanced budget amendment. (Source: Candidate’s website.)

Employees Pension Fund.

Voting “Yes” on Dallas Proposition One would curb benefits received by retired city employees who are hired after January 1, 2017. The proposition would decrease the amount of annual benefits retirees receive, lower cost of living adjustments from five percent to three percent, raise the age of retirement to 65 from 60 and require that employees work for the city for a total of 40 years to receive benefits, the Dallas Morning News reportsApproval of the measure would save an estimated $2.15 billion over the next 30 years. This is the only proposition on the ballot for voters in Dallas and is not related to the Dallas Police and Fire Pension Fund.

Rangers Stadium Proposal.

The proposed Texas Rangers stadium has so much going for — and against it. For starters, the current stadium has only been in use since 1994. Compare that to the 38 seasons the Cowboys spent at Texas Stadium in Irving, and it’s easy to see why some would Arlington voters would question the new stadium being built. Well, that and the $500 million price tag. But, on the other hand, the proposed new spot is promising a retractable roof and a new Guy Fieri restaurant within walking distanceThe Save Our Stadium coalition argues that not enough data has been made available to Arlington voters about the stadium’s estimated cost, that Globe Life Park was built to last 100 years, and that it would be wasteful to begin construction on a new stadium so soon after the last one was paid off. Arlington voters are pretty split on what to do despite the $1.47 million that has been spent on efforts to sway public opinion in favor of the new stadium. A poll last month found that 42 percent of voters favored the new stadium and 42 percent opposed it, so it definitely looks like it’ll go down to the wire. The debate picked up some heat this week, though, when Arlington mayor Jeff Williams said opponents of the stadium lacked the “intelligence” to understand that the stadium would be an investment, according to a secret recording published by the Dallas Morning NewsIf Arlington voters approve the proposition, it would add a new parking tax and Rangers ticket tax, as well as extend a car rental tax and a hotel occupancy tax.

Obed Manuel and Kip Mooney contributed to this piece.

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