This Is What It Looks Like When 20 Dallas Photographers Spend Four Days Documenting The City.

For three years now, we’ve been telling you about Dallas photographer Richard Sharum and the interesting and ambitious ways through which he’s been forcing his documentation of street culture to the forefront — first by leaving prints around town for anyone to grab and then by producing massive prints of his shots and hanging them on the sides of Downtown Dallas buildings.

For the third year of his ongoing “Observe Dallas” project, though, Sharum took things in a decidedly different direction. Instead of showcasing his own work in ever-interesting ways, Sharum this year hosted a street photography workshop for 20 area photographers, both amateur and professional.

Says Sharum of the direction change: “I wanted the Observe Dallas project to move beyond my personal vision and to include other photographers in DFW who had an interest in Documentary Photojournalism or Street Photography… By sharing my experience and advice, I wanted to see what 20 students from all experience levels could do if made to go out and express their view of Dallas in four days. We broke down the empathetical impact and psychology of activist photography in class to create a final documentation.”

That “final documentation” arrived this past Saturday night at the 500x Gallery, where Sharum helped showcase his students’ efforts over the course of their four-day explorations — a collection Sharum then compiled into the below video for everyone else to see.

Check it out for a taste of just how different Dallas can look from the up-close vantage points of 20 unique perspectives:

Adds Sharum of the overall experience with his third Observe Dallas project: “My hope is that it becomes a movement in Dallas for all who want to highlight people and things in this city that need attention, and to push the individual boundaries of creativity.”

And who can’t get on board with that?

Cover photo by Jaime Hudson.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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