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Before we get around to what you should do tonight, let us get first recommend something you should absolutely not try. No matter how strapped for cash you are, faking a heart attack in a Walmart so your buddy can swipe some toys probably isn't the best way to finish off the last bit of your holiday shopping. People, it turns out, tend to get suspicious when you suddenly get up, brush yourself off, shrug and mutter a “no big deal” as you sprint into a waiting getaway vehicle.

Live and learn, I guess.

That said, here are some things you definitely should try out tonight. — Cory Graves

Red Bull #Yearender at Trees (Free w/ RSVP)
The songs on Forever, the last month-released debut album from Mystery Skulls, are riddled with honest truths. Take the album's current single, “Ghost,” for instance. Aside from the absurdly catchy funk rhythms and electronic pulses that are present throughout the album, the lyrics of this cut essentially tell the story of how Luis Dubuc, the project's mastermind, started this new endeavor and his new life. “This time I might just disappear,” Dubuc sings on that track's hook. And, well, that's basically just what Dubuc did. It's all working out for him, too — and in ways that Dubuc couldn't have even imagined. Over the course of the past few years, Mystery Skulls has gained some serious traction. For starters, the act signed a major label deal with Warner Bros, which agreed to release his music. And, better yet for Dubuc, Mystery Skulls has found an audience, too: Forever debuted at No. 1 on the iTunes Electronic charts, and the official music video for “Ghost,” which was created by YouTube animator MysteryBen27, has already garnered over two million views in less than a month. See what the fuss is all about at this, the second of Red Bull's two #Yearender shows at Trees, where he'll perform along the similarly-minded Wrestles and 8-bit punks Anamanaguchi. Even better? It's free-to-attend, so long as you RSVP here in advance. — Mikel Galicia

Big Bang at Beauty Bar
Monday night's Erykah Badu-hosted, Dave Chappelle after-party in the House of Blues' Foundation Room was one hell of a time, to be sure. But the fact that Dave was getting down so hard on the dance floor right alongside us normos was really only part of the reason. Badu's one of the few people in town that can't help but sing along at frequent points during her DJ sets — and one of the few you'd even want to, for that matter. She's the only one, though, that can cut the speakers during an Outkast tune and casually drop the, “that's my baby's daddy” line, too. She will, of course, join Sober at tonight's edition of his Big Bang weekly. — CG

Fresh 45s at Crown and Harp
About a year ago, we expressed confidence that the third-Thursday, all-vinyl DJ affairs presented by Salt-N-Pepa's Spinderella and Too Fresh Productions' Joel Salazar had capably “established itself as one of Dallas' new must-attend affairs.” Joining them at for this month's edition is New York's BreakBeat Lou. Resident DJs Jay Clipp and JT Donaldson will also be there. So expect a time, folks. Oh, and get there early, too. Why? Well, because not only is this sure to become a crowded affair, but because the cover charge goes from $10 to $15 at 10:30. — Pete Freedman

RoboCop at Texas Theatre
There are two awesome facts about Paul Verhoeven's RoboCop — which turned 27 this year — that should make every Dallasite proud: 1) Peter Weller, RoboCop himself, graduated from the University of North Texas, and, even cooler, 2) key locations from the film were shot in Dallas. What better setting to re-watch this one, then, than in a theatre in futuristic Detroit Dallas? — Chase Whale

K. Michelle at Medusa
One person who won't argue against the power of reality television: R&B singer K. Michelle, who parlayed a recurring role on VH1's Love & Hip-Hop: Atlanta into a starring role on VH1's Love & Hip-Hop: New York and, then, into a record deal with Warner Bros., which released her debut LP, Rebellious Soul last year. The disc's did well, too, reachign as high as No. 2 on the Billboard 200, thanks in large part to the strength of bouncy lead single “V.S.O.P.” — PF

Ugly Christmas Sweater Party at Cosmos Bar
This year, ugly Christmas sweaters are bigger than ever, and retailers have taken to offering various promotions and discounts to customers sporting the garish duds. At Cosmos, tonight, there's opportunities to win cash, should you show up with the ugliest sweater in the place. Having trouble finding the perfect thing to wear to this one? We know just the place you should look. — CG

Scrooged at Alamo Drafthouse
Bill Murray's 1988 classic Christmas comedy is a somewhat different take on Dickens' A Christmas Carol. Try to catch the cameos from Murray's three brothers as well as Miles Davis as you rewatch it this evening. For the special screening, Alamo's will be offering a five-beer flight of holiday brews especially paired with the film. — CG

Pegasus Reading Series at Two Bronze Doors
For the final installment of Word Space's Pegasus Reading Series of 2014, local poets Logen Cure, Mag Gabbert, Chris George and Lucas Jacob will read tonight. You can read up on their backgrounds here. There'll be some open mic spots available following the presentation for any poets that show up. — CG

Elm Street Tattoo's 18th Annual Charity Christmas Party at Curtain Club
There's a few rules if you're looking to celebrate with the Elm Street Tattoo folks during their 18th annual charity Christmas party, including dressing in fancy attire, bringing an unwrapped toy and $15 for cover. For your trouble you'll get to watch Red Animal War, John Moreland, Matt Hillyer, Roadside Preachers, REMOS and Rodeo Bros, as well as access to the party's open bar. Worth it? Worth it. — CG

To find out what else is going on today, this week and beyond, check out our events page.

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