Drink Some Cheap Beer With FIDLAR.

From the looks of things, this nine-year-old Minneapolis boy is well on his way to becoming the next Frank Abagnale.

Before even reaching a double-digit age, he's honed techniques for boarding trains without his parents, sneaking into a water park without a ticket, stealing cars, and, most recently, finding his way onto a commercial flight without a ticket. It's only a matter of time, really, before he finds a secondhand pilot uniform on the internet and cons the airline into letting him fly one of those suckers.

A much easier task? Finagling your way into a music venue without a ticket — not that we're in any way condoning that action.

All we're saying is maybe you should catch one of these shows if you can.

FIDLAR at Lola's Saloon
For a handful of reasons, we expect FIDLAR to fare much better this trip to town than the band did late last year when it came through to perform at KXT's third anniversary bash. For one thing, FIDLAR lost the crowd pretty early on at that show when the band's lead vocalist committed a pretty big no-no: He referred to the sparse Dallas crowd as Houston — a mistake that was quickly met with a few boos. It was kind of a shame, too, as FIDLAR's actually a fun band. In a different environment — like, say, when the band later opened for Wavves at Prophet Bar in March — that KXT show would've been a great set. There certainly is a time and a place for rowdy songs about cocaine, blacking out and wake-and-bakes, but, let's face it, that time and place is not in front of a KXT-adoring crowd dutifully celebrating the radio station's birthday on a Sunday night. Expect a much more rambunctious set at Lola's tonight. Oh, and check out our interview with FIDLAR singer/guitarist Zac Carper here. — Mikel Galicia

Walk the Moon at House of Blues
Cincinnati indie pop-rockers Walk The Moon took their name from a Police song, but sound more like indie pop-rockers from Cincinnati. Still, their “Anna Sun” single, like, totally blew up the alternative charts last fall. That song's about a crumbling household! — Chelsea Upton

Saves the Day at Trees
This probably ain't the Saves the Day that you remember at all: Since starting work on its three-part album concept back in 2005, the band has seen a revolving door of members pass through its ranks, and its most recent album, 2011's Daybreak, has seen the band ditching the angry emo thing for a more optimistic approach. — CG

Phosphorescent at Cambridge Room
Alabama singer-songwriter Matthew Houk's first big breakthrough under his current nom de plume came after his 2009 album To Willie, which he dedicated, in its entirety, to Willie Nelson. This year, meanwhile, has been a busy one for Houk, who released his latest album, Muchacho, and has been touring nonstop since early summer, playing a couple dates with Robert Plant, and doing both weekends of ACL. — CG

Bo Burnham at Majestic Theatre
The beginnings of Bo Burnham's musical comedy career were about as humble as it gets. Back in 2006, while still in high school, Burnham uploaded a couple of videos of himself performing a pair of self-described “pubescent comedy” songs to YouTube with the thinking that it would be the easiest way to share them with his classmates and his brother, who was away at college. By 2008, he'd go on to film a special for Comedy Central and release an EP on the channel's record label. — CG

Ghostbusters Quote-a-Long at Alamo Drafthouse
For years, it seems the only option for movie-watching where yelling in the theater was encouraged was The Rocky Horror Picture Show. It was fun for awhile, but there's only so much popcorn you can throw at the same movie over and over without it starting to get a little stale. In recent years, however, we've noticed an upswing in sing-a-long and quote-a-long films being screened around town. This one won't be subtitled, but we hear there'll be plenty of marshmallows on hand to throw at the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man. — CG

An Evening With The Lone Bellow and the Fox and the Bird at Church of the Incarnation
Like Ryan Thomas Becker, Isaac Hoskins, and Chambers did out in Denton last month — and St. Vincent is getting ready to do later this month — these acts will be opting to ply their crafts in an intimate church setting rather than the typical bar or music venue. One has to wonder that, as these types of performances are becoming more the norm, some of the magic will be lost in the process. Are churches inherently amazing live music venues, or does some of that come with the uniqueness of the setting? We expect that much will start becoming quite apparent during the next few months. — CG

Typhoon at Three Links
The Portland outfit routinely plays with 12 to 14 members onstage at a time, mixing strings and horns into its intricately-crafted, densely-layered orchestral pop tunes. It's a mix that should pair well with Dallas chamber-minded pop outfit Home by Hovercraft and Houston indie-poppers Wild Moccasins, who'll serve as this show's openers. — CG

To find out what else is going on today, this week and beyond, check out our events page.

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