Wild Out.

Next month, NASA will begin accepting applications for new astronauts. Before you start padding your resume, though, you should know something — space kind of sucks.

As it turns out, gravity is pretty essential to the human body, and without it our muscles atrophy, our faces swell and our eyes go bad. What's more, astronauts are required to poop into little suction tubes and aren't permitted to take showers.

Back on planet earth, things are undeniably pretty great. Even on a Monday night in Dallas there's plenty of ways to spend your time that won't totally destroy your body.

Modern Baseball at Trees
The pop-punk/emo/folky rock hybrid Modern Baseball is a group of Pennsylvania-based early twentysomethings that sings about all kinds of real life subjects that almost never has anything to do with sports. Tiny Moving Parts, Jeff Rosenstock and PUP open.

Born Ruffians at Dada
On one hand the publicist for Canadian indie outfit Born Ruffians describes the band's material as “tightly wound, trapezoidal songs frothing over with hooks and wryly cathartic lyrics.” On the other hand, just about everybody compares these guys to acts like Talking Heads, The Pixies, Bowie and The Strokes. Make of that what you will. Young Rival opens.

Scott Weiland & the Wildabouts at South Side Music Hall
Earlier this year, Scott Weiland released the first record with his new band The Wildabouts, the first batch of all-new material he's put out since 2008. It's a little glammier than STP and not quite as terrible as you're probably imagining. In any case, it's about 1,000 times more listenable than the output his old bandmates have crafted with Linkin Park's Chester Bennington. The Kul opens.

AGFA Secret Screening at Alamo Drafthouse (Free)
Once a month Alamo Drafthouse will hold screenings of rare 35mm prints — everything from b-movies to classics. The thing is, you won't know what movie they'll be showing that night until the lights dim and the projectors start rolling. Good, bad, or otherwise, though, your tickets won't cost a thing.

Blink at Ochre House
Following a car wreck, snobby one-percenter Derek is led around by a puppet ghost all A Christmas Carol-style to teach him about life and the way it goes by at the blink of an eye. Expect just as many laughs as life lessons in this Kevin Grammer-penned musical comedy which made its world premiere at this theatre last weekend. Tonight's staging is a pay-what-you-can affair.

To find out what else is going on today, this week and beyond, check out our events page.

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