The Feds Are Arresting Texans Who Owe As Little As $1,500 In Outstanding Student Loan Debts.

Watch out, everyone: The feds want your student loan debts paid, and they're not afraid to use automatic weapons to make that happen.

A few days ago, Houston resident Paul Aker says he was greeted at his door and arrested by seven U.S. Marshals dressed in combat gear and bearing copious arms, who were there to arrest him for failing to pay back his college student loans from 29 years ago.

The cost of that debt? $1,500.

It should be noted that Aker wasn't completely in the right here. The marshals claimed they only showed force because Aker had threatened them by saying he was armed, which Aker disputes. Meanwhile, Houston authorities say they have been contacting Aker for several years now about failed payments for a loan he received at Prairie View A&M University in 1987.

Even so, sending seven armed marshals to Aker's door for what is the modern-day equivalent of a little more than seven credit hours at UNT seems a little extreme.

But for giving them trouble, he was ordered to pay the marshals $1,258.60 as reimbursement for the arrest, as well as interest and court fees on top of his owed debt.

Now here's where this applied to the rest of us: Sources have said that the U.S. Marhals are planning to serve up to 1,500 more people with unpaid student loans in the near future.

God bless the education-industrial complex.

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