On Scouts Guide To The Zombie Apocalypse And The Rest Of The Weekend’s New Film Releases.

Our Brand is Crisis.
Director: David Gordon Green.
Writer: Peter Straughan.
Cast: Sandra Bullock, Billy Bob Thornton, Anthony Mackie, Ann Dowd.
Playing At: Wide.
There's a lot of potential in this comedic remake of the 2005 documentary. Billy Bob Thornton and Sandra Bullock play rival campaign advisers during a highly contested presidential election in Bolivia. But writer Peter Straughn (Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy) isn't exactly known for his quick wit, which is what this film needs. Reviews from festivals were very lukewarm, but I'll see Sandra Bullock and Billy Bob Thornton in just about anything.

Burnt.
Director: John Wells.
Writer: Steven Knight.
Cast: Bradley Cooper, Sienna Miller, Daniel Bruhl, Omar Sy.
Playing At: Wide.
Despite starring in the highest-grossing movie of 2014 (American Sniper), Bradley Cooper has not had a great year. Aloha flopped big time and Burnt has had its release date shifted more times than a manual transmission car going up a mountain road. Cooper plays Adam Jones — the movie's previous title. After getting out of rehab, he returns to his old restaurant in an attempt to get an elusive third Michelin Star. Will he make amends despite being a tremendous asshole? Or, as our own Javier Fuentes writes is that plot point pretty much secondary to all the food porn?

Scouts Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse.
Director: Christopher Landon.
Writers: Carrie Evans, Emi Mochizuki, Christopher Landon.
Cast: Tye Sheridan, Logan Miller, Joey Morgan, Sarah Dumont.
Playing At: Wide.
Maybe we've reached peak zombie. Tye Sheridan waves goodbye to his kiddie roles, as the leader of a Boy Scout troop trying to survive an outbreak of the undead. Expect lots of gore and boner jokes, if that's your thing.

Truth.
Director: James Vanderbilt.
Writer: James Vanderbilt.
Cast: Cate Blanchett, Robert Redford, Dennis Quaid, Topher Grace.
Playing At: Wide.
Cate Blanchett, one of our greatest living actresses, sinks her teeth into the role of news producer Mary Mapes. She worked at CBS when Dan Rather (Robert Redford) was fired over the story that alleged President George W. Bush received special treatment to avoid serving in Vietnam, despite relying on documents that may not have been authentic. The film details the controversy, but seems to be explicitly on Mapes' side. Bias aside, Truth has a solid cast and a great writer in James Vanderbilt, who makes his directorial debut. According to CT critic Angela Jones, that's about all it has, though.

Carter High.
Director: Arthur Muhammad.
Writer: Arthur Muhammad.
Cast: Vivica A. Fox, Charles S. Dutton, Pooch Hall, David Banner.
Playing At: Wide.
Carter High School, the Dallas football powerhouse that dominated the late '80s and '90s, finally makes it to the big screen. The program, led by Freddie James (Charles S. Dutton) courted controversy by playing ineligible players and intercepting signals from opposing teams. The film won't be as good as Friday Night Lights, but there should be plenty of rousing football action.

Room.
Director: Lenny Abrahamson.
Writer: Emma Donoghue.
Cast: Brie Larson, Jacob Tremblay, Joan Allen, William H. Macy.
Playing At: Angelika Plano, The Magnolia.
Brie Larson has been earning raves all year as the mother of Jack (Jacob Tremblay). Both of them have been held captive in a small shed for years, only to escape and find it difficult to adjust to life on the outside. The film is sure to elicit tears of both agony and ecstasy. Audiences at the Toronto International Film Festival gave it their People's Choice Award, which has gone to past Oscar winners like 12 Years a Slave, Silver Linings Playbook and Slumdog Millionaire.

The Armor of Light.
Director: Abigail Disney.
Playing At: Cinemark West Plano.
The Armor of Light focuses on a preacher Rob Schenck, who advocates for gun control from a biblical perspective, much to the chagrin of politically conservative flock. Bound to provoke powerful reactions no matter which side of the debate you're on, the filmmakers have held screenings with both clergy and NRA officials in the hopes of at the very least starting a conversation.

Tab Hunter Confidential.
Director: Jeffrey Schwarz.
Playing At: Texas Theatre.
Tab Hunter was one of the biggest stars of the 1950s, winning the hearts of girls all over the U.S. But as a closeted gay man, the success didn't mean much because he couldn't be himself. His autobiography becomes a moving documentary, featuring interviews with his peers and fans.

Repertory Pick of the Week.

Trick 'r Treat.
Director: Michael Dougherty.
Writer: Michael Dougherty.
Cast: Anna Paquin, Brian Cox, Dylan Baker, Leslie Bibb.
Playing At: Alamo Drafthouse.
Showing: Saturday, October 31.
There are plenty of scary movies to see this Halloween, but unlike most of them, you'll be one of the only ones to ever see this one in a theater with an audience. Trick 'r Treat was a hit at festivals in 2007 and 2008, but sadly went direct to DVD in 2009. This horror anthology — which is part of a great but out-of-fashion genre — has just the right mix of humor and scares. So take a chance on this one. You are in for a treat (pun intended).

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