Tanoshii Ramen Misses the Mark.

Tanoshii Ramen.
2724 Commerce Boulevard.
Deep Ellum

Ambiance: 3 out of 4 pork buns.
Food: 1 out of 4 pork buns.
Service: 4 out of 4 pork buns.

It's great that ramen has finally begun to have it's moment in the sun.

Sure, there have been a handful of Japanese restaurants in town where you've always been able to get some — and, absolutely, it pops up as an occasional special here and there — but, all in all, this isn't much of a town for finding yourself face first in a bowl slurping noodles.

Tanoshii Ramen opened up about two months ago, though, hoping to change that. And, to date, the spot has been incredibly well-received. In the restaurant's first two weeks of operation, people waited upwards of two hours just to get their first tastes of Tanoshii's offerings.

And, to be sure, Tanoshii rocks on more than a few fronts. The food looks amazing, the service is great and the restaurant does a great job making the place look cool.

The problem is that Tanoshii just doesn't stack up when it comes to its ramen bowls' authenticity and quality.

There's no need to recite some boring laborious history of the style of the food here, but suffice it to say that Tanoshii just does a mediocre to poor job of filling its bowls with broth and noodles.

The Tonkotsu broth — usually a pale, opaque, milky color — is very shallow in flavor and lacks the richness and snooze-inducing fattiness of the real deal. The Shoyu broth — a soy- and meat broth-based soup — doesn't boast the proper yin and yang of salty and tangy flavors.

See, there's a difference between a deep, salty, fermented flavor and just using too much salt in your broth. As a result, you'll find yourself needing to use Tanoshii's provided condiments in order to fix up your bowl proper.

But here's the worst part: The noodles, which are the most integral part to a good bowl of ramen are made in-house daily at Tanoshii, are just sorely lacking. They don't have the chew and heft that ramen noodles are expected to have.

Traditional ramen noodles are served very al dente and highly alkaline, boasting a very specific color and texture. They are crafted to work with both the broth and the ingredients in a given dish.

But the noodles that come with Tanoshii bowls are frail and pale.

It’s good that people are enjoying it, sure. Ramen is, on the whole, pretty great.

But hopefully the success of Tanoshii will open the doors for other ramen shops to open in these parts in the future. And hopefully some of them will focus a little more on the quality of the bowls they are producing.

4544_2

4544_3

4544_4

4544_5

4544_6

4544_7

4544_8

4544_9

4544_10

4544_11

4544_12

4544_13

4544_14

4544_15

4544_16

4544_17

4544_18

4544_19

4544_20

4544_21

4544_22

4544_23

4544_24

4544_25

4544_26

4544_27

4544_28

4544_29

4544_30

4544_31

4544_32

4544_33

4544_34

4544_35

4544_36

4544_37

4544_38

4544_39

4544_40

4544_41

4544_42

4544_43

4544_44

4544_45

4544_46

4544_47

4544_48

4544_49

4544_50

No more articles
X