Grown Men Freaked Out Like Little Kids When Thunder Clapped Above Rangers Ballpark Last Night.

Last night, before breaking for this week's All-Star festivities, Your Texas Rangers ended the first half of their 2012 season on a high note: They beat the Minnesota Twins in a 13-inning affair that saw the hometown heroes rallying back from down 3-1 in the 9th so Ian Kinsler could eventually get the team a W with a walk-off RBI single in the 13th.

The win helps the team enter the All-Star break with a record of 52-34, just half a game back of the New York Yankees for the best record in baseball.

But, more than that, last night's affair proved one thing for certain: Grown as the men who play professional baseball may be, most are little fraidy cats like you and I.

Well, except for Rangers players Ian Kinsler, Adrian Beltre, Elvis Andrus and David Murphy.

They're real men.

In the fourth inning of last night's game, thunder struck so loudly above Rangers Ballpark that players on both sides began fleeing for cover.

Twins outfielder Josh Willingham, who was on first base at the time of the thunderclap, dove for the ground. Twins first-base coach Jerry White hid behind the first-base umpire for protection. Rangers catching Mike Napoli bounded out of his crouch behind home plate and sprinted for the Rangers dugout.

Pretty much everyone else was rattled, too. Within seconds, the entire field was cleared as each teams' entire roster had rushed for the protection of their dugouts.

All save for Kins, Beltre, Elvis and Murph, who gathered near second base to enjoy a laugh over the matter.

A few minutes later, rainfall caused umpires to put the action on pause and, all in all, the game was delayed for 46 minutes.

In the end, though, no one was hurt.

We do imagine, however, that some egos were bruised.

Scroll right to watch the MLB.com clip of the thunderous moment in all of its glory.

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