Remember When The Killers Were Awesome.

Tonight, your options are a lot like life.

You can go check out something you once loved and hold out hope that it'll be as good as you once remembers it being. Or you can check out something that's a little like something you once loved, while hoping that it reminds you enough of that thing you once loved to the point where you feel good about it. Or, better yet, you can try something completely new and maybe find a new love.

We don't really care which option you end up choosing — so long as you allow us to reserve the right to judge you and your choice, and to talk about what it says about you behind your back.

The Killers and The Virgins at the Verizon Theatre
So, the new Killers record, Battle Born? It's an awful, all-over-the-place, way-too-theatrical mess. Like, it's not even remotely good. Shame, too, 'cause it was supposed to be a return-to-form or whatever — this, at least, according to frontman Brandon Flowers, who is prone to making such grandiose statements about the band he left just a couple years to give the solo thing an unsuccessful go. Anyway, now post-hiatus, he's back with the old gang, penning songs that are nowhere near as good as the songs on Hot Fuss and Sam's Town, two albums the band put out that are unarguably great. Maybe the band will only play cuts from those albums at tonight's show. Probably not, but, hey, cross those fingers regardless.

J.D. McPherson and Ronnie Fauss at the Belmont Hotel
Find me a bookie in town willing to take on local music bets, and I'll lay down money on KXT's Barefoot at the Belmont selling out every goddamn time. And, y'know what? I'd win, too. Maybe even set myself up for an early retirement. Anyway, tonight's advanced sellout at the prettiest place to catch an outdoor show in town (seriously, that behind-the-stage view of the skyline is gorgeous) is especially disappointing because headliner J.D. McPherson does this pretty cool retro Buddy Holly rockabilly thing. Update: Because of the rain, this show's been moved to the Kessler Theater. Also, as a result of the venue change, a few extra tickets have been made available. Pertinent: Those tickets will run you $25 — cash only, we're told — at the door of the venue tonight.

Found Footage Festival at the Texas Theatre
A dude from The Onion and another from The Late Show with David Letterman are the masterminds behind this touring festival, which finds them touring the country to show such random clips as “McDonald's Custodial Training Video (1983).” Basically, this is kind of like traveling through a YouTube wormhole of random videos with that “funny” guy from the office at the helm of the mouse.

Ceremonial Sign Lighting at Deep Ellum Brewing Co.
The folks at DEBC have erected a new sign at their brewery — one that can be spotted by the drivings passersby on I-30, even. Hey, good on them for that. Good on them for celebrating it the only way they know how, too, by hosting a ceremonial lighting of the sign while tapping several kegs.

Ola Podrirda, Daniel Hart and Chambers at Dan's Silverleaf
David Wingo may live in New York these days, but his indie folk outfit's name is a dead giveaway of his local ties: He swiped the name from an old shopping and etnertainment complex on Coit Road. Anyway, Ola Podrida's only part of how Wingo pays his bills these days; he also spends his time scoring films for director David Gordon Green. Fittingly, his fellow local on this bill, Daniel Hart, does that too these days, working with area filmmaker-done-good David Lowery.

Y La Orkesta, Charlie Parr and Sam Anderson at Live Oak Music Hall
Thanks to his work as a collaborator and side player in such revered acts as Calexico and DeVotchKa, Sergio Mendoza's about as respected a musician as you're likely to find. So it's no surprise, then, to hear that his own outfit, Y La Orkestra, is earning all sort of praise in the Latin music world. One review I've found even goes so far as to compare what Mendoza and La Orkestra are doing to the mambo to what Daptone's done for soul, which is no small compliment. This, unfortunately, is about all you can find of their recorded material online, though. Anyway, this is a stacked bill from top to bottom, with revered country blues musician Charlie Parr and Quaker City Night Hawks' Sam Anderson rounding it out.

A is for Arab: Stereotypes in U.S. Popular Culture at Willis Library at the University of North Texas
How's this for holding a mirror back up to society? This UNT-hosted exhibit, which runs through May 23, will showcase over 3,000 popular culture depictions of Arabs in an attempt to show us just how racist we can all be. Prepare to feel horrible about yourself!

One More Time: A Tribute to Daft Punk at the House of Blues
Pretty much anyone can dress up as a robot and press play on an mp3, so good on these guys for being the first to come up with the idea and capitalize on the fervent Daft Punk fandom that exists in the world. Warning: Those already sick of the “Is 'Get Lucky' the best song ever?' debates online need not bother attending this one.

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