There's More To Addison Than Chain Restaurants, Turns Out.

Addison is, as you know, a suburb of Dallas. But, as you may not know, it's also kind of an eating destination thanks to its so-called “Restaurant Row.”

Hear us out: Along this strip, a sea of just about every restaurant type that you can imagine exists. In less than a five-mile radius, you can find more than 150 eateries — ranging from fast-food options to five-star restaurants, traditional spots to fusion joints, and, well, pretty much everything in between. In turn, Restaurant Row claims that it has more restaurants per capita than any other city west of the Mississippi.

If you're wondering how such a large concentration of food purveyors came to be, thank a change in legislation in the 1970s, (much like similar efforts currently taking place up north), which allowed restaurants to serve alcohol without special memberships.

But unlike another neighborhood off Belt Line where restaurants have flocked to find secondary markets, Addison has earned its reputation thanks to the fact that it has spawned franchises such as Texas de Brazil and Fogo de Chão, while also boasting the first Dunns Bros outpost outside of its home in Minneapolis.

It's kind of a reverse bubble effect, really.

And one that comes with some drawbacks: Ask most people about eating in Addison and they'll tell you that it's nothing more than a chain haven. And, sure, while it’s easy to get lost among all the familiar options that this area boasts, there are plenty of independent and specialty eateries in this restaurant mecca, too.

Here, we take a look at a few that are worth checking out.

Canary By Gorji.
5100 Belt Line Road.
This restaurant focuses on Mediterranean food with a Texas influence. Chef Mansour Gorji pioneered the use of pomegranates in the Dallas food scene, using the fruit as a garnish and in sauces. The price points here are a little steeper than your typical casual dining options, but with an intimate setting focused on the diner rather than quick turnaround, you're guaranteed to get your money's worth with grass-fed ribeye, seared Texas quail legs and Mediterraneans favorites such as hummus, tzatziki, tabbouleh and dolmades.

Kenny’s Wood Fired Grill.
5000 Belt Line Road.
This 1940s Chicago-style chop house comes with a pretty good reputation, particularly for being one of the best places to get a steak in Dallas. The menu focuses on classic American dishes, including brunch items such as chicken and waffles, French toast, and “Kenny's Spin on Benedict,” which can be made with either ham, salmon, steak or a crab cake. Prices stay between the casual and semi-casual range, but with very little topping out at above $40.

La Spiga Bakery.
4203 Lindbergh Drive.
Perfect for the breakfast and lunch crowd, this Italian bakery and cafe has been a staple in the area for the past two decades. The menu is simple — it's composed of a few breakfast items, pizzas, salads, pastas and soups — while the bakery side of things does both retail and wholesale goods. Price points here stay on the casual side, making it perfect for people not looking to break the bank while still getting great quality food.

Ramen Hakata.
3720 Belt Line Road.
One of the newest members to Restaurant Row, this restaurant serves tonkotsu ramen, a style known for its thick pork broth and skinny noodles. The price points are pretty friendly, too. Here, a bowl of ramen starts at $8 (not including add-ons for things like soft-boiled eggs or extra noodles), and appetizers start at $4. Also: It's BYOB, which makes it a great place for lunch and casual dinner crowds.

Tokyo One.
4350 Belt Line Road.
Known for bringing the concept of a sushi buffet to North Texas, the spread here also includes a ramen bar, plus hibachi grill options. The restaurant specializes in fresh sushi and sashimi, tempura, cooked entrees and salads for an all-you-can-eat dining experience, making it ideal for people who can't seem to get their sushi fix elsewhere. The price range just slightly peaks out of the casual dining experience at $32.99 for dinner and $16.99 for lunch, but, for free reign at the buffet, it's worth the extra money.

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