El Come Taco Has More Fun With Its Menu Than Any Other Taco Joint In Town.

Welcome to Look At This Fucking Dish, our recurring feature highlighting the craziest, most decadent dishes found in and around Dallas. It's pretty much exactly what it sounds like.

El Come Taco.
2513 North Fitzhugh Avenue.
East Dallas.

If I could only say one thing about El Come Taco, it would be this: Eating at this spot makes for one of the most unique dining experiences you'll ever have.

A lot of this has to do with the owner, Luis Villalva.

The first time I met Villalva, there was an instant rapport. I ordered three tacos — veal brain, cow tongue and brisket. Sadly, Villalva was out of the brains. But, from that point on, I think he could tell I was interested more in the fringes of his menu.


Before I tore into my tacos — because once I start eating, I have no self control — I asked Villalva about a rumor I had heard regarding his menu. Apparently, there was a short stint where grasshopper tacos could be ordered. Villalva confirmed that this was true, and proceeded to tell me about his aspirations for his ever-evolving menu.

It was the sort of conversation that teaches you just how in love with his restaurant Villalva truly is. You can tell he cares deeply about providing an experience that doesn't succumb to the monotony of a static menu. As proof, Villalva left and came back with a cling-wrapped mass off meat under his arm. He proceeded to tell me about how someone from the surrounding neighborhood had just made it and that he was going to try it in some tacos. He described the recipe, which came from the Yucatan. He was obviously excited at the prospect of trying something new.

It was inspiring.


It's crazy ingredients like the grasshoppers and the cling-wrapped mystery meat that have earned Villalva a “Look At This Fucking Dish” mark of approval in my book. Because anyone that cooks veal brains, grasshoppers and cow tongue in the largely boring American taco landscape is clearly on the right path.

But, see, here's the thing: His tacos aren't just weird. They're great.


El Come's cow tongue, served as a single slice in the taco, has some of the most powerful flavor of any meat on the menu. It's a light and easily eaten meat, with no chewy or fatty texture to fight through. Its flavor, like much of the tacos at the restaurant, lacks spice but makes up for things with subtle complexity and a lingering aftertaste.

The veal brain, meanwhile, boasts an unexpected flavor. It's a largely subdued taste, possessing almost no discernible flavor attached to its light, fall-apart-in-your-mouth texture. Yet it still provides a great sponge for the salsas provided for each table.

As for the grasshopper? Villalva admits that it's tough to find any takers for that option. These days, he doesn't carry it too often.

Even so, we still had to pick this guy's brains some about his crazy taco inclinations.


OK, so you're out of grasshopper today. You've still gotta tell me what they're like.
Have you ever had fried pig? Pork rinds? They are sort of like that. Crunchy and airy.

Do you like them?
[Laughs] Not really. Not my favorite.

Are there any other things you want to try here that American diners aren't used to?
Oh, yeah. Grasshoppers are actually hard to find someone to buy from. A lot of things that are popular in Mexico are hard to get in America. I really want to try ants. Like ant eggs. Pile them up on a taco and serve them.

That sounds… interesting. How can I keep up with the options on your menu?
Oh, just follow us on Facebook and Twitter. That's what I mainly use.


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