Need Some Extra Cash? Sell Your Old Clothes To These Always-Eager Buyers.

Let's face it: We can all use a little extra beer money now and then. But, for many, the million-dollar question isn't just how to get that extra income rolling in — it's how to do it legally, how to earn it without working a second job, and how to maintain it without assistance from M&D Financial Securities (otherwise known as The Bank of Mom and Dad.)

Now, listen: Carrie Bradshaw was on to something when she said, “I like my money right where I can see it — hanging in my closet.”

See, we've all got closets. Big closets, small closets, walk in closets, storage closets. Some of us even live in apartments the size of closets. But, it's safe to say that, as long as there are no real skeletons in your closet, there's probably someone out there who's willing to buy your old or unworn things.

Actually, come to think of it, there are some establishments willing to take your skeletons, too. Take Dolly Python, for instance.

The East Dallas vintage emporium and novelty store buys pretty much anything — from the expected vinyl records, film cameras and Victorian garb to the more-bizarre postmortem items, bones and even pickled sharks — so long as it's cool. Why anyone would hold onto or want some these things is beyond us, but, the point is, if you've got it and there's a market for it in Dallas (niche or otherwise), then chances are they'll take it off your hands, very few questions asked.





On the other hand, if you're looking to sell something a little more practical — like Forever 21 blouses or that American Apparel spandex unitard that, at one time, fit you more like a glove rather than a Polish sausage casing — there's always the trusted Buffalo Exchange.

Leaning towards the trendy side, this Lower Greenville location of the national chain tells us they're currently on a major lookout for upcoming spring 2014 styles — “skirts, shorts or kaleidoscopic floral prints,” specifically, in fact.

So, when rummaging through your stuff, feel free to channel your inner hippy. Just don't forget to launder your acid-wash jean shorts before attempting to sell them. While people do cycle through Buffalo Exchange's doors with entire trash bags full of clothes at a time, the popular thrift spot won't take just any old junk. See, they only buy clean articles — items free of pit stains or anything else you might have picked up from last year's SXSW shenanigans. So just wash your stuff, OK?




On the topic of junk: The Junky Monkey, a vintage store (of the sorts) located in a charming house on Henderson, is another story within itself.

While Shonda, the fabulously flamboyant shop owner, doesn't necessarily have a typical buying or consigning process per se, she hits up estate sales like it's no one's business, which are like a goldmine for vintage finds. And when this businesswoman doesn't have time to shop around for her store because she's too busy serving customers or being a mom, she places her own clothes for sale.

“Just because it's kinda been slow, everything [in the store] is really mine,” she says from behind the counter, giggling.

But not to fret: If you have something worth selling, she might just hook you up or barter for it.

“What I do do,” she says, “is, if you come in and spend money, I let you trade items as well.”

And who wouldn't want to participate in a good ol' fashioned swip-swap? Especially when your options aren't limited to decades or trends. See, Junky Monkey runs the gamut: The store stocks everything from what you might have imagined your mom to wear in the '70s to more current labels like DVF. Whatever you choose to trade in, you're sure to get something in return that maintains a certain level of quality, uniqueness and funk.




University Park, on the other hand, may be less known for its uniqueness or funk, but instead for its designer names. Still, when looking to unload your goodies, this neighborhood, which boasts its fair share of consignment stores itself, isn't to be overlooked. And it's not always super stuffy, either.

Preston Center's Clothes Circuit, is stuffy only in the sense that it's stuffed to its maximum capacity with spring clothes, glitzy accessories and stiletto pumps. Better yet, this is a spot that will never turn its nose up to a new customer. A 31-year-old establishment with over 23,000 consigners to date, the spot accepts nearly 500 new units a day, taking in every brand, from Gap to Gucci. And with the store's “55 percent them, 45 percent you” rule, you're bound to get a healthy slice of the pie for dropping your goodies off here, too.

Just make sure to clean press your clothes and bring your own hangers, then wait the 60-day consignment period to see what items of yours sold.




So, as it seems, getting a couple extra George Washingtons in your wallet isn't all that difficult. All it takes is investing some time in the annual tradition of cleaning out your closet each spring and then heading over to your local vintage, thrift or consignment store.

Remember: Your closet is always in business, no matter the season.

So start selling your unwanted shit. It might not make you a billionaire, but at least you'll always be able to throw down for a six-pack next time your roommate offers to go on a beer run.

All photos by Kathy Tran.

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