On Terminator: Genisys And The Rest Of This Weekend's New Releases.

Magic Mike XXL.
Director: Gregory Jacobs.
Writer: Reid Carolin.
Cast: Channing Tatum, Joe Manganiello, Matt Bomer, Adam Rodriguez.
Playing At: Wide.
If you're just here to see the guys disrobe on the way to the stripper convention, well, you've come to the right place. If you wanted anything beyond that, well, good luck. There's plenty of fun to be had here, to be sure, and the dance routines are extremely well done. But the horrible dialogue that takes place in between is the price you’ll have to pay for your night out. Read my full review here.

Terminator: Genisys.
Director: Alan Taylor.
Writer: Laeta Kalogridis, Patrick Lussier.
Cast: Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jason Clarke, Emilia Clarke, Jai Courtney.
Playing At: Wide.
Despite boasting a strong cast (except for Jai Courtney), I still have one pressing question: Why? After going from bad (Rise of the Machines) to worse (Salvation), I'm at a loss to see how Hollywood can keep hoping to reach the highs of the first two films without James Cameron at the helm. Director Alan Taylor's last film is the worst Marvel movie (Thor: The Dark World) and stopping yet another Terminator from going back in time to kill Sarah or John Conner just feels completely redundant at this point.

Faith of Our Fathers.
Director: Carey Scott.
Writers: Carey Scott, Harold Uhl.
Cast: Kevin Downes, David A.R. White, Mansfield, Candace Cameron Bure.
Playing At: Wide.
Would you like a poorly done Vietnam War movie? How about an overly sentimental father-son reunion? And would you like it to come from the studio that brought you the literally preachy God's Not Dead? Then Faith of Our Fathers is the rah-rah-sis-boom-bah, ain’t-America-great movie you need this Fourth of July.

Infinitely Polar Bear.
Director: Maya Forbes.
Writer: Maya Forbes.
Cast: Mark Ruffalo, Zoe Saldana, Keir Dullea, Wallace Wolodarsky.
Playing At: Angelika Dallas, Angelika Plano.
Maya Forbes makes her directorial debut here, loosely telling the story of how she and her sister managed to grow up with a bipolar dad (Mark Ruffalo) and an absentee mom (Zoe Saldana). You’ll need to pack the tissues, but reviews indicate the movie comes by the tears honestly.

The Wolfpack.
Director: Crystal Moselle.
Cast: Bhagavan Angulo, Govinda Angulo, Jagadisa Angulo, Krsna Angulo.
Playing At: Angelika Dallas.
One of the best-reviewed documentaries of the year, The Wolfpack follows the Angulo brothers, who grew up shut off from the world by their controlling father and found escape through cinema.

In Stereo.
Director: Mel Rodriguez III.
Writer: Mel Rodriguez III.
Cast: Beau Garrett, Micah Hauptman, Maggie Geha, Mario Cantone,
Playing At: Texas Theatre.
David (Micah Hauptman) and Brenda (Beau Garrett) make up and break up a lot in this romantic comedy set in New York City. I’ve yet to see how this one distinguishes itself from dozens of other similar movies, but hopefully writer-director Mel Rodriguez III has some tricks up his sleeve.

Closer to God.
Director: Billy Senese.
Writer: Billy Senese.
Cast: Jeremy Childs, Shelean Newman, Shannon Hoppe, David Alford.
Playing At: Texas Theatre.
Noooooo! Have these scientists learned nothing from Splice, Frankenstein or Gattaca? Don’t ever try to create life in laboratory! Nothing good can come of it!

Robot Overlords.
Director: Jon Wright.
Writer: Mark Stay, Jon Wright.
Cast: Gillian Anderson, Ben Kingsley, Callan McAuliffe, Gerladine James.
Playing At: Texas Theatre.
I like Gillian Anderson and Ben Kingsley as much as the next person, but this British sci-fi flick looks like a giant bundle of cliches. To paraphrase Kent Brockman: “I, for one, do not welcome our these Robot Overlords.”

Repertory Pick of the Week.

Jaws.
Director: Steven Spielberg.
Writers: Peter Benchley, Carl Gottlieb.
Cast: Roy Scheider, Richard Dreyfuss, Robert Shaw, Carl Gottlieb.
Playing At: Inwood Theatre.
Showings: Friday, July 3 and Saturday, July 4.
If you missed any of the several showings last week for the official 40th anniversary of the landmark film, here's your latest chance to catch the film that changed summer movies forever. It still holds up tremendously, too, because of Spielberg's incredible control of tone, the film's mere suggestion of terror and the great performances from the main trio of actors. This, folks, is a blockbuster. Maybe the blockbuster.

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