A Sit-Down With Crown & Harp's Moody Fuqua. Plus: Conflicted Thoughts On Gentrification.

On the premiere episode of Burning Bridges with Rodney Blu, I introduce myself and my show, the newest edition to Central Track podcast lineup. But that's just the very start, as I also give my conflicted take on the current state of Deep Ellum and its ongoing evolution.

As a child of one of Dallas' many unique neighborhoods, my perspective on the growth of the city is one that is inherently contradictory. Although I find myself advocating for the better treatment of the places where we live and play, the collateral damage attached to these improvements is often cringe-worthy. I want access to nice things, but without fundamental change to the things that made me fall in love with these areas in the first place. Is that so much to ask for? I don't know. I just know that I have a strange relationship with gentrification, and I attempt to vocalize that here on the first episode of Burning Bridges.

From there, I sit down with one of the most prominent cultural facilitators in Dallas, Moody Fuqua, the general manager and talent buyer for Lower Greenville's Crown & Harp. We discuss the revival of Crown & Harp and his role in it, the beauty of synchronicity in the city's various music scenes and his current and future efforts as one of the more compelling talent buyers in the local live music community.

Oh, and the whole thing is served up with an incredible audio backdrop provided by DJ Junk Food.

So tune in, and spare no comment or critique.

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