Downtown's Neon Pegasus Hasn't Been Shining Right For Months. That Could Change Tomorrow.

It's nighttime. I'm driving along the highway, glancing at my beloved Dallas skyline, looking for the same three landmarks I've revered since I was a kid.

The big green building known as Bank of America Plaza. The spinning-ball restaurant that is Reunion Tower. The neon red Pegasus perched atop the Magnolia Hotel.

Only, uh, there's kind of a massive problem. For the past few months, the Pegasus' lights have barely been lit up at all.

Considering that the neon-adorned statue isn't that old, the issue's a little surprising. Though the original was erected in 1934 by the Magnolia Oil Company, the whole thing was replaced on New Year's Eve in 2000 as a part of a midnight millennial celebration.

Still, while the 8,000-pound duplicate cost around $600,000 to make and install, it too has problems every so often. Since 2000, city officials say it's really been a day-to-day gamble to see if the piece is still fully functioning. As such, they've basically long given up on the rotation mechanism that once allowed the piece to rotate in the sky.

The good news is that the city's aware of the fact that the iconic skyline feature's lights haven't been working right of late. This weekend, a maintenance crew will be attempting to fix this very concern. Thanks to the Keep the Pegasus Flying Fund, new lights have been purchased for the Pegasus. Starting tomorrow, these workers will walk out onto the Magnolia’s roof to start replacing the lights.

One problem: “We won't know for sure if all the lights work until they finish repairs,” says Kay Kallos, manager of the city's public art program. “If all the neon doesn't work, they will have to order more, and it will be a few more days. They just don't know if everything is going to work until they test it.”

Hey, that's a start, right? It's something, at least.

Turns out, we aren't the only ones worried about the statue. The Pegasus has an intense following, and, as we did, people tend to get pretty upset when it's not in shape.

“I have residents of the downtown area who, whenever they see a problem with the Pegasus, call the office of cultural affairs and report it,” Kallos says.

In other words: It takes a literal village.

Adds Kallos: “The Pegasus has always been a high priority for maintenance.”

Hopefully this means that, after this three-month waiting period, our beloved neon Pegasus will return to its millennial glory.

Well, minus the rotation, of course.

But maybe that's something we can hope for in the future.

3937_2

3937_3

3937_4

3937_5

3937_6

3937_7

3937_8

3937_9

3937_10

3937_11

3937_12

3937_13

3937_14

3937_15

3937_16

3937_17

3937_18

3937_19

3937_20

3937_21

3937_22

3937_23

3937_24

3937_25

3937_26

3937_27

3937_28

3937_29

3937_30

3937_31

3937_32

3937_33

3937_34

3937_35

3937_36

3937_37

3937_38

3937_39

3937_40

3937_41

3937_42

3937_43

3937_44

3937_45

3937_46

3937_47

3937_48

3937_49

3937_50

No more articles
X